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UKArchive ID: 27891The Desire for Justice In the Eloquent Peasant by ChairmanWow
Originally published on July 16, 2012 in Poetry

Ninth Dynasty ancient Egypt, rural area near Herakleopolis.



Khun-anup led his donkeys
around the large linen sheet
the overseer Nemtynakht maliciously
spread across the public road.
While crossing the fields the donkeys
began eating the landowner's wheat. Like
a bird caught in the snare, Khun-anup
was whipped under the blazing sun and his
donkeys were confiscated by Nemtynakht.

Khun-anup went out to find the landowner,
Rensi son of Meru. He found him at the banks
of the Nile, in the heart of the fashionable city,
began by addressing him with great praise,
lauding his fields of rich amber grain,
fine livestock, and the benefits of his
successful industries.
"Only those who truly work the land will
truly posses the land," he repeated,
continuing in this fashion
for nine days, eloquently stating his case
for justice. Finally, believing he was being ignored,
he insulted the rich landowner: "My children
will go hungry because you have stolen my donkeys.
A thief rich or poor does not work the land. Only
those who truly work the land will posses it!"

Khun-anup was punished with another whipping.
Rensi, after sending the Eloquent Peasant away,
went on a tour of his many enterprises and grain fields,
visiting last his freshly hewed tomb,
which compelled him to read the transcript of Khun-anup's last speech.
After reflecting on all this Rensi changed his mind. He ordered the donkeys
returned to Khun-anup, along with all of Nemtynakht's
property and his job. Thus the overseer became
in one day
as poor as the peasant he oppressed.

© ChairmanWow (chairmanwow on OLD UKA)
UKArchive ID: 27891
Archived comments for The Desire for Justice In the Eloquent Peasant
niece on 16-07-2012
The Desire for Justice In the Eloquent Peasant
A very interesting story, Ralph...loved the way it ends especially ...

Regds,
niece

Author's Reply:
Thanks for the great comment niece.

Ralph

amman on 16-07-2012
The Desire for Justice In the Eloquent Peasant
I don't know how you find these Ralph. Skillfully composed tale of morality. Would that today's leaders were so fair and compassionate.
Cheers.

Author's Reply:
The story comes down from ancient Egypt. I added imaginative details to help explain the landowner's change of heart.Appreciate the comment.

Ralph

Texasgreg on 16-07-2012
The Desire for Justice In the Eloquent Peasant
You been munching peyote there, bro? LOL. Now did you find these characters somewhere, or make 'em up?
Regardless, it was a fun-reading write on a subject that will never fail to disappear.

Good Job!
Photobucket.
Greg 🙂

Author's Reply:
Texasbro, you are right about this being a never-ending subject matter. Sometimes to focus on what's close you have to look far away.

Ralph

Andrea on 16-07-2012
The Desire for Justice In the Eloquent Peasant
Peyote in that Arizona desert, eh?

There's a moral to this story, a moral to this song (as Mr Dylan once said).

Great stuff - much enjoyed. Served the bastard right!

Author's Reply:
Actually peyote is only found in Texas... Thanks for the discerning comment.

Ionicus on 16-07-2012
The Desire for Justice In the Eloquent Peasant
Nothing new then, Ralph. There was injustice in ancient Egypt as there is in modern times all over the world.
It was reflecting his own mortality that made Rensi change his mind. Perhaps he was afraid of the consequences in the after-world. A nice morality tale.

Author's Reply:
Your comment sums it up very well, as usual, Luigi.

Ralph

Texasgreg on 20-07-2012
The Desire for Justice In the Eloquent Peasant
Just like you to redirect attention to the poor, defenseless Texan.

Photobucket

Author's Reply:
i'm your huckleberry 🙂